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Past events and mentors inspire a positive change in entrepreneurship
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Every year on June 16, South Africa remembers those who have fallen and those who carry the legacy and principles of selflessness, determination and devotion for the success and growth of the nation.

Past events and mentors inspire a positive change in entrepreneurship

“If you find a path with no obstacles it probably doesn’t lead anywhere,” American lawyer and politician, Frank A. Clark. 

South Africa is known for its violent history as a result of Apartheid and the repercussions it had on Black, Indian and Coloured people in the country. One of the events that sparked havoc during segregation was the 1976 June 16 Soweto Uprising against Bantu Education.

Students from various schools began to protest in the streets of Soweto, in response to the introduction of Afrikaans as the medium of instruction in black schools. 

The peace protest turned violent after police opened fire, which resulted in hundreds of students killed and injured. 

Every year on June 16, South Africa remembers those who have fallen and those who carry the legacy and principles of selflessness, determination and devotion for the success and growth of the nation.

Driven by a spirit of hope and determination, there are sparks of a better tomorrow in South Africa. The increase in social entrepreneurship makes it possible for young entrepreneurs to find positive solutions in their societies. 

For instance, in Gugulethu, Cape Town, there are young entrepreneurs who use tourism as a way to teach locals and foreigners about the history of the township.

In Khayelitsha, there are a number of business owners that use cycling tours to introduce locals and foreign travellers to parts of the township we never knew existed.

Africans have a way to turn something that was once negative into a positive landscape, to inspire hope and determination.

According to the 2014-2015 Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) reports, South African youth entrepreneurship propensity is the lowest in Africa with 23.3% as compared to Malawi and Uganda with 55.2% and 55.4% respectively.

The GEM report highlighted South Africa’s youth entrepreneurship participation as the lowest in the African continent with only 12.8% as compared to other African countries. 

The latest GEM report states that South Africa's total entrepreneurial activity is behind the average of other economies with a GDP per capita of less than $20.000 USD.

These reports show the lack of belief and support given to the youth of South Africa on an entrepreneurial level, which affects the recreational facilities for employment.

Tai Lopez, an American entrepreneur, investor and TED speaker created a few rules of success, called The law of 33%.

These rules are influential ways that youth entrepreneurs can empower themselves to stay motivated, challenge themselves and innovate their observation in their surroundings. 

The 33% rule states, there are 3 levels of people you should have in your life whom you spend your time with.

33% of your time should be spent with mentors (people who challenge you, whom you can learn from).

These people make you uncomfortable, however, they push you out of your comfort zone and help you to grow.

33% of your time should be spent with your peers. These people have similar goals and engage with you on the same level on certain ideas and topics. They push you towards your goals.

Lastly, 33% of your time should be spent with people whom you mentor and guide (whom you can teach). It’s not about being better than others, but these people keep you motivated, level headed and make you remind you of the goodness you contribute to the world.

Change is inevitable but hopefully, by the end of this year, it will mark a positive change for youth entrepreneurs in South Africa and Africa as a whole.

Share with us some of the work you do in our comments section - we would love to get in touch with you!

- Additional reporting by Lonwabo Marele.

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